“When should I introduce technology to children?” As a technology company aimed at children, we hear this question frequently from friends, family and acquaintances, whether they are parents, uncles and aunts, grandparents or people who plan on having children some day. 

Our first piece of advice is: don’t give children a tablet or phone before they turn 2 years old. Screen exposure to children under the age of 2 doesn’t bring any benefits and can entail on the delay of cognitive functions. It is worth noting that television is also a screen and the same due care as the phone and tablet must be taken! If the child is older than 3 years old and is already asking for screens, we have posted about the time limits of screen exposure 

Many adults get concerned when their children, grandchildren, nephews and nieces or children they know are not interested in screens, don’t ask to play on the phone or are not “into television”. Stay calm: they are not going to be behind their classmates in terms of technology. 

Technology is moving forward at increasingly faster rates and children who learned how to use phones in the 2010s will have to relearn to use the ones from 2020, since they will be completely different technologically. Technology was made to be intuitive and easy to use. If your children become interested at the age of 12, rest assured they will learn to navigate the device quickly and with ease. The same applies to 5, 7 or 10 year-olds. 

The later they come into contact with cell phones and technology, the safer children will be. We know there are many benefits: a number of apps aimed at child development are arising and are true amusement parks to the little ones’ creativity, but we can’t ignore the fact that the screen is enticing. If we, adults, already lose track of time when we are on the phone, for children that is even worse.

Our stance is this: the more children want to wait before starting their “technological life”, the more they will benefit from technology. But there’s no need for polarization. If children show an early interest in technology, there is no problem in letting them use it responsibly, with adult participation and supervision, time limits and the consumption of quality content suitable for their age.